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March 7th, 2014
 

Polk GOP Delegate Slate Pared Down to 27 Names

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Written by: Kevin Hall
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The backlash against the Polk County GOP’s pre-selected slate of delegates for the district and state conventions has been pared down for the second time. It now includes only 27 names, comprised of elected Republican officials, 2014 candidates, two state central committee members, three Polk GOP officers, convention parliamentarian Cleon Babcock and platform committee Co-Chair Lee Booten.

This list is likely to be much more palatable to Republicans who expressed concern about an initial slate of 99 names, which included candidates’ and officials’ spouses and many loyalists to Governor Branstad. After Polk County Republicans expressed concern about that slate, which was delivered to delegates by mail last Friday, the list was pared down to 50 names Saturday morning.

Thursday night, the Polk County GOP released the new slate of 27. The new list, ‘Exhibit B 2.0’ is actually smaller than the slates presented and adopted at both the 2010 and 2012 Republican Party of Polk County Conventions.

The Polk GOP also emailed delegates an amendment to the proposed rules, which if adopted, would approve the new slate, allow one delegate from smaller precincts and two delegates from larger precincts to move on to the district and state conventions.  A total of 263 delegates and 263 alternates to the district and state conventions will be selected on Saturday.

There is significant interest in who gets selected as delegates for a variety of reasons. Republicans who are unhappy with the current regime in charge of the state party would like to reclaim it via the conventions. District convention delegates elect State Central Committee members. The SCC acts as the Republican Party of Iowa’s board of directors. The SCC will choose a new chairman and co-chair next January.

Additionally, crowded fields in the Third Congressional District and U.S. Senate GOP primaries could cause those races to be decided by convention delegates. If no candidate receives at least 35 percent of the vote in the June primaries, the delegates will select the nominee.

The Polk County GOP convention begins at 9am Saturday morning at Ankeny High School. TheIowaRepublican.com will live blog the proceedings.

Below is the newly released slate of delegates chosen by the Polk County GOP’s nominating committee:

TITLE FIRST NAME LAST NAME  
Convention Parliamentarian Cleon Babcock  
Platform Co-Chairman Lee Booton  
Governor Terry Branstad  
Polk County Supervisor Robert Brownell  
State Representative Peter Cownie  
U.S. Cong. Candidate Robert Cramer  
Candidate for Iowa Senate Jeremy Filbert  
Candidate for Iowa House Leisa Fox  
U.S. Cong. Candidate Joe Grandanette  
State Representative Chris Hagenow  
State Representative Jake Highfill  
U.S. Senate Candidate Mark Jacobs  
Finance Director Darrell Kearney  
State Representative Kevin Koester  
3rd District SCC Gopal Krishna  
State Representative John Landon  
U.S. Representative Tom Latham  
Candidate for Iowa House Zach Nunn  
County Party Chair Will Rogers  
Candidate for Iowa House Clair Rudison  
National Committeeman Steve Scheffler  
U.S. Cong. Candidate Monte Shaw  
Polk County Supervisor Steve Van Oort  
County Party Co-Chairman Sherill Whisenand  
U.S. Senate Candidate Matt Whitaker  
State Senator Jack Whitver  
U.S. Senate Candidate Brad Zaun  

About the Author

Kevin Hall
Kevin Hall brings almost two decades of journalistic experience to TheIowaRepublican. Starting in college as a radio broadcaster, Hall eventually became a television anchor/reporter for stations in North Carolina, Missouri, and Iowa. During the 2007 caucus cycle, Hall changed careers and joined the political realm. He was the northwest Iowa field director for Fred Thompson's presidential campaign. Hall helped Terry Branstad return to the governor's office by organizing southwest Iowa for Branstad's 2010 campaign. Hall serves as a reporter/columnist for TheIowaRepublican.com.




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