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March 1st, 2010

Jamison Makes State Treasurer Campaign Official – It’s time to put Iowa First

Jamison HSDave Jamison has been involved in Republican politics in Iowa for decades. He is currently the Story County Treasurer and has been since 1995. He’s known by most in Republican circles for his work on the Republican State Central Committee and the statewide organization he co-founded, the Iowa Republican County Officials Association, which helps Republicans get elected at the county level across the state.

Jamison now has his eyes set on statewide office, and later today, he will officially announce his campaign for State Treasurer. Last Friday, Jamison announced that former United States Attorney Matt Whitaker, who ran for State Treasurer himself in 2002, will serve as Jamison’s statewide campaign chair. Whitaker gives Jamison’s campaign a well-known and respected surrogate to help build support across the state.

In an interview with TheIowaRepublican.com late last week, Jamison outlined the issues on which he plans to campaign across the state. Unlike previous campaigns against current State Treasurer Mike Fitzgerald, candidates like Jamison now have a whole host of issues to create stark contrasts between themselves and the 28 year incumbent treasurer. Jamison’s “Put Iowa First Campaign” is designed to highlight many of the areas where Fitzgerald deserves to be questioned.

Jamison talked extensively about the $300 million dollars of IPERS funds which were stolen under Fitzgerald’s watch. While the State Treasurer is one of seven members of the IPERS board, he is the only member who the voters elect to represent them. In fact, the State Treasurer is supposed to be the custodian of the IPERS fund. Jamison told TheIowaRepublican.com, “The $300 million that Westridge Capital stole from state employees and retirees shows a lack of due diligence by Fitzgerald.”

Jamison went on to explain that the $300 million lost in Westridge Capital’s Ponzi scheme under Fitzgerald’s watch far exceeds amounts involved in other state scandals like the CIETC, which involved the misuse of $1.8 million. Jamison also raised question about whether or not Westridge received preferential treatment. He cited an IPERS report to the Government Oversight Committee which pointed out that deadlines were extended and the initial request for proposal was amended to so that Westridge could be selected.

Jamison noted that the depository for IPERS funds is the Bank of New York. If elected, he wants to explore opportunities to keep Iowa’s investments in local financial institutions if they offer competitive rates and are secure investments. He also proposed letting local Iowa banks and financial institutions compete with Vangaurd in offering college savings investment (529) plans.

Jamison also said that he would use the office of the State Treasurer to speak out against bonding proposals, like Governor Culver’s I-Jobs program, that leave mountains of debt for future generations to repay. That would be a big departure from the current State Treasurer, who is only concerned about the state’s bond rating instead of the ramifications of massive state borrowing.

Before Jamison can face off against Fitzgerald next fall, he will first have to win a Republican primary against Dyersville Mayor Jim Heavens. Heavens’ announced his campaign for State Treasurer at the end of November. In the primary for State Treasurer, Jamison holds a considerable advantage over Heavens. He has already amassed an impressive list of endorsements and has active county chairs for his campaign in more than half of Iowa’s 99 counties.

In an election year that looks like it is going to be favorable for Republicans, there is a real chance at unseating both Secretary of State Mike Mauro and State Treasurer Fitzgerald. Helping the Republican nominees in both races will be a strong top-of-the-ticket led by Senator Grassley. Jamison is the clear favorite to emerge from the Republican primary, and it looks like he is ready to go head-to-head with Fitzgerald this fall.

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About the Author

Craig Robinson
Craig Robinson is the founder and editor-in-chief of TheIowaRepublican.com, a political news and commentary site he launched in March of 2009. Robinson’s political analysis is respected across party lines, which has allowed him to build a good rapport with journalist across the country. Robinson has also been featured on Iowa Public Television’s Iowa Press, ABC’s This Week, and other local television and radio programs. Campaign’s & Elections Magazine recognized Robinson as one of the top influencers of the 2012 Iowa Caucuses. A 2013 Politico article sited Robinson and TheIowaRepublican.com as the “premier example” of Republican operatives across the country starting up their own political news sites. His website has been repeatedly praised as the best political blog in Iowa by the Washington Post, and in January of 2015, Politico included him on the list of local reporters that matter in the early presidential states. Robinson got his first taste of Iowa politics in 1999 while serving as Steve Forbes’ southeast Iowa field coordinator where he was responsible for organizing 27 Iowa counties. In 2007, Robinson served as the Political Director of the Republican Party of Iowa where he was responsible for organizing the 2007 Iowa Straw Poll and the 2008 First-in-the-Nation Iowa Caucuses. Following the caucuses, he created his own political news and commentary site, TheIowaRepublcian.com. Robinson is also the President of Global Intermediate, a national mail and political communications firm with offices in West Des Moines, Iowa, and Washington, D.C. Robinson utilizes his fundraising and communications background to service Global’s growing client roster with digital and print marketing. Robinson is a native of Goose Lake, Iowa, and a 1999 graduate of St. Ambrose University in Davenport, where he earned degrees in history and political science. Robinson lives in Ankeny, Iowa, with his wife, Amanda, and son, Luke. He is an active member of the Lutheran Church of Hope.




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