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May 7th, 2009

Caring Before and After Birth

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Written by: Battleground Iowa
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By Emily Geiger

I saw an awesome story yesterday, and it got me to thinking. I’ve heard a lot of criticism lately about how pro-lifers only care about babies before they are born.

I can tell you that that is 100% not true. There are a lot of Christian pro-lifers who donate to charities such as pregnancy centers that not only help moms before birth, but also supply moms with things like formula, diapers, baby clothes, etc. after birth.

Countess Christian pro-life families act as foster parents and often wait for years to adopt children. Countless others sponsor underprivileged children overseas, and some are even able to adopt foreign orphans.

I think some of the misconception that pro-life Christians don’t care about already-born children is because conservatives often don’t support government programs that are thought to help children. Conservatives are made out to be greedy, heartless meanies who just don’t care.

Nothing could be further from the truth. Conservatives just feel that charity should not be a function of government, but rather, is better and more efficiently handled by private entities and churches. And an added bonus, when charity is private, I get to choose which causes I donate to instead of being mandated to donate to causes I don’t approve of (i.e. my tax dollars going to Planned Parenthood).

Further, if liberals are so concerned about the welfare and education of kids after they are born, I have to wonder why liberals hate poor kids so much and why that doesn’t get more attention, but I digress.

But, back to that awesome story. You see, this story is about one of those little babies that pro-lifers cared so much about and how he’s doing now.

This was a photo that got a lot of attention about ten years ago.
handofhope1
It was taken during a pre-natal , in utero surgery when little Samuel Armas was only 21-weeks young… a time when abortions are still quite common and very legal. Samuel needed surgery to help repair some problems associated with a condition he had, spina bifida, which happens when the spine is not enclosed properly within the body of the baby as it develops. Spina bifida babies are often aborted.

Here’s how the photographer who took the photo, Michael Clancy, described what happened.

“I could see the uterus shake violently and then this little fist came out of the surgical opening,” Clancy recalls. “It came out under its own power. When Dr. Bruner lifted the little hand, I fired my camera and the tighter Samuel squeezed, the harder Dr. Bruner shook his hand.”

Clancy, who used to describe himself as pro-choice, now is a regular speaker at pro-life events.

And little Samuel? He’s now 9 years old. He wears leg braces and sometimes uses a wheelchair, but he’s active in Cub Scouts, loves swimming, and recently got first place in a 25-meter backstroke race.

And what does Samuel think about being famous even before he was born?

“When I see that picture, the first thing I think of is how special and lucky I am to have God use me that way,” Samuel told FOXNews.com. “I feel very thankful that I was in that picture.”

Samuel really believes that people seeing his fully-formed hand when he was only 21 weeks old has touched people and changed hearts and minds on the abortion issue.

“It’s very important to me,” Samuel said of the photograph. “A lot of babies would’ve lost their lives if that didn’t happen.”

Samuel is a shining example of how valuable every life is… before and after birth.


About the Author

Battleground Iowa
Emily Geiger writes from a conservative perspective on everything from politics to religion to pop culture. Like the original Emily of Revolutionary War era, this Emily is delivering important messages crucial to winning the raging war of the time, but today, this is a culture war rather than a traditional one. And, like the original Emily, sometimes it takes a woman to do (or say) that which lesser men lack the courage and tenacity to do.




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